Top 10 New York times best sellers

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Top 10 Best Books New York Times.

Top 10 New York times best sellers. The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and one of America’s most important and popular newspapers. Therefore, it is obvious that the votes of this famous newspaper will be a very reliable basis and well worth a reference. If you are a person with an endless passion for books, looking for good books, you can absolutely refer to the best books voted by the New York Times below.

 

  1. War (Margaret MacMillan)

This is a slim book, but it delves into a fascinating subject: war. Margaret MacMillan examines the ways in which wars have affected human society and, in turn, changes in political organization, technology or ideology that have influenced how and why they are we fight.

War explores controversial questions such as: When did the war begin? Does human nature destroy us to fight each other? Why are warriors almost always men? Will war ever be in our control?

War (Margaret MacMillan)
War (Margaret MacMillan)

MacMillan states that, although war has led to many great disasters in human history, it has also led to many of the greatest achievements of human civilization. Drawing lessons from wars throughout the past, from classical history to the present day, MacMillan reveals the many sides of war how it determines our past, our future, our views about the world and our very conception of ourselves.

 

  1. Uncanny Valley (Anna Wiener)

Uncanny Valley is Anna Wiener’s memoir about her journey from working as an editor to setting foot in Silicon Valley technology companies to re-imagine a bygone era. Anna Wiener’s memoir is a rare first look at the reckless, soaring startup culture at a time of unchecked ambition and the ascent of political power.

Anna deftly charts the tech industry’s shift from self-appointed world savior to liability jeopardizing democracy, along with a personal story of aspiration, atmosphere, and aspiration. around and disappointed.

Uncanny Valley (Anna Wiener)
Uncanny Valley (Anna Wiener)

Tireless and fierce, Uncanny Valley is a cautionary tale and a revelatory interrogation of a consequential world whose unwitting designers are only just beginning to understand. In witty and sincere words, but also fiercely without hesitation, Uncanny Valley is a warning to a world with unpredictable consequences in the future.

 

  1. Shakespeare in a Divided America

James Shapiro is a true Shakespeare scholar with many books on the famous playwright. Yet in his new book Shakespeare in a Divided America, he still doesn’t repeat himself.

In a story that spans centuries, from revolutionary times to the present day, leading scholar James Shapiro traces the unparalleled role Shakespeare’s 400-plus-year-old tragedies and comedies played in unraveling many concerns that American identity has changed.

His story culminated in the 2017 controversy over the Central Park staging of Julius Caesar, in which a Trump-like leader was assassinated. It can be said that the book is not just about Shakespeare and his plays, it is about the history of America itself.

 

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  1. A Promised Land (Barack Obama)

 

Focusing on his political career, the presidential memoir chronicles Obama’s life from his early years through the events surrounding the May 2011 killing of Osama bin Laden.

What sets Barack Obama’s memoirs apart from other presidents’ memoirs lies in his inner thoughts. Obama leads the reader inside his head as he ponders the vital issues of national security, examining every detail in his decision-making process. He also describes how it feels to endure a tough legislative system and gives his thoughts on public health care reform and the economic crisis.

The book received rave reviews and was included in the list of the year’s best books by The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Guardian.

 

 

  1. Hidden Valley Road (Robert Kolker)

Hidden Valley is the true story of an American family with twelve children, six of whom were diagnosed with schizophrenia. It is also the first family to be studied by the American Institute of Mental Health. , in the hope of having a scientific answer to this phenomenon.

What goes on inside the house on Hidden Valley Road is truly extraordinary. Their story takes a dark history of the science of schizophrenia, from the age of institutionalization, caesarean section and maternal schizophrenia to the search for signs. genetics for the disease, there has always been profound disagreement about the nature of the disease.

 

 

  1. The Vanishing Half (Brit Bennett)

The Vanishing Half tells the story of two identical twin sisters from a small town in the American South. But one lives in a black community, and the other lives in a white home with a larger world.

Brit Bennett has skillfully built a tight and subtle plot to tell about the thorny issue of racism in America. Thereby, each character has the opportunity to reflect on their own identity and identity. As with New York Times best-selling debut The Mothers, Brit Bennett offers a fascinating flip-flop about family and relationships, incredibly rich and provocative, compassionate and wise .

 

 

  1. Homeland Elegies (Ayad Akhtar)

Homeland Elegies is a work that is deeply personal but also full of politics. Homeland Elegies blends reality and fiction to tell an epic tale of yearning and appropriation in the world that happened on 9/11. Part family drama, part social essay, part picnic novel, its core revolves around a debate between an American son and an immigrant father about the country they both call is the homeland.

The New York Times rated Homeland Elegies as a very American novel, bearing the sound of The Great Gatsby with all the connections about America itself

 

 

  1. Hamnet (Maggie O’Farrell)

Hamnet tells the story of Shakespeare’s son written on true events. The work opens with the death of an 11-year-old boy and delves into the relationship between Hamnet, his mother Agnes, and his father (famous playwright William Shakespeare). And Hamnet himself may have been the inspiration for William Shakespeare to write the famous Hamlet play.Top 10 New York times best sellers

The book describes the endless pain of a mother when she sees her child leaving the world without a father by her side. However, the unique feature of the book is that, throughout Hamnet, the name of the great playwright Shakespeare is not mentioned even once.

 

 

  1. Deacon King Kong (James McBride)

James McBride has reimagined 1960s Brooklyn in a meaningful, multi-layered crime detective novel. A drug lord’s sudden death leads to a wide-ranging investigation and opens up a society full of chaos.

The reason for this desperate outbreak of violence and the aftermath stems from Deacon King Kong, James McBride’s touching, humorous novel and his first since he won the National Book Award. The Good Lord Bird.

In Deacon King Kong, McBride brings to life those affected by the shooting: the victim, the African-American and Latino residents who witnessed the incident, the white neighbors, the local police. Locals tasked with investigating, members of the Five Ends Baptist Church where Sportcoat served as deacon, the Italian bandits of the neighborhood, and Sportcoat itself. As the story deepens, it becomes clear that the lives of the characters caught up in the chaotic swirl of 1960s New York overlap in unexpected ways. Top 10 New York times best sellers

 

When the truth comes out, McBride shows us that not all secrets are hidden, the best way to grow is to face change without fear, the seed of love lies in hope. and compassion. Bringing these pages to life with his masterful storytelling skills and unwavering faith in humanity, James McBride has written a novel bit by bit related to The Good Lord Bird and as emotionally true as Color. of water .

 

 

  1. A Children’s Bible (Lydia Millet)

A Children’s Bible is one of the New York Times’ ten best books of the year, an indelible novel about teenage alienation and adult complacency in a bright world.

This brilliant novel by Lydia Millet was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize – her first novel since winning the National Lamb of Heaven Book Award.

Despise the parents, who spent their days indulging in alcohol, drugs and sex, whose children simultaneously felt abandoned and suffocated. When a storm of destruction descends on the summer grounds, the leaders of the group including Eve, the narrator decide to run away, leading the young people on a dangerous foray into the final chaos outside position.

A Children’s Bible is a heartbreaking, prophetic tale of generational divide and haunting perspective. In lighthearted writing, Millet delivers an allegory of climate change, infusing ancient myths with new meaning and hope.

 

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